Travel to Lyme Regis : United Kingdom

Lyme Regis is a delightful seaside resort and Dorset’s most westerly town. A Royal Charter was granted to the town by Edward 1 in 1284 and ‘Regis’ was added to the name, prior to that it was known as Lyme. In the 16th century Lyme Regis was
Lyme Regis is a delightful seaside resort and Dorset’s most westerly town. A Royal Charter was granted to the town by Edward 1 in 1284 and ‘Regis’ was added to the name, prior to that it was known as Lyme. In the 16th century Lyme Regis was one of the South Coasts most important ports. Lyme Regis overlooks Lyme Bay, the setting is beautiful, the town is made up of steep narrow streets, colour washed cottages and stylish villas lining the sea-front.

This area is famous for its many fossils, the cliffs geology been perfect for preserving fossils. The cliffs around are still full of fossils, because of the unstable nature of some cliffs it is recommended you explore the beach areas where you can still find ammonites. Children get great enjoyment from exploring the great rock pools around. If you are planning on these types of water related activities on your holiday break you should always check the tide times.

There are various boat trips departing from the Cobb during the summer months, the scenic tour will take in many popular attractions and you will enjoy miles of unspoilt coastline. You can book Mackerel fishing trips which are apparently popular with families.

If you prefer to stay on land you can relax on the beach and enjoy looking or swimming in the sea, have a stroll along the traffic-free promenade, relax in a quiet garden. Up the steps, stroll through narrow streets explore the galleries and studios, there are some interesting shops to browse around. You will find cafes/bars for refreshments where you can sit and enjoy the holiday atmosphere.

You can have a meal at a variety of cafes, restaurants and pubs in and around the town. An enjoyable evening can be spent having an evening meal while admiring the views on the waterfront. The Marine Theatre offers a diverse programme of entertainment throughout the year, for more details contact the local Tourist Information Office. There are some lovely walks to enjoy, some with spectacular sea views, after exploring the maze of streets in the old town stroll down to the harbour and watch the pleasure and fishing boats coming and going.

If you are a serious walker you can get information from the Tourist Information Office. There are numerous walking opportunities from Coastal Paths to Country Trails. You will find plenty of water sport opportunities available as well as dry land activities. The Cobb, the curving harbour wall, is a popular visitor spot and where you will find the Marine Aquarium, tanks hold unusual specimens of fish and sea-life which the fishermen have caught locally. You can learn about the lives of fishermen, it is well worth visiting.

Other places of interest include the Philpot Museum on Bridge Street; the museum houses a collection of maritime and domestic items, paintings, photos, and provides information on local history and geology. In Coombe Street housed in an 18th century chapel is Dinosaurland with models of dinosaurs and collections of local fossils. Lyme Regis has had some literary visitors in the past, Jane Austin stayed here, John Fowles’s novel The French Lieutenants Woman was filmed on location here.

There is a choice of accommodation in this area from self-catering cottages, hotels, B&B Camping & Caravan Parks, Holiday Parks, the choice is yours. There are many attractions on offer in the town and surrounding areas to enable you to have an active or relaxed holiday break.


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